The Act of Remembrance

The Act of Remembrance

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them

We will remember them

                                                                                           by Laurence Binyon

What are we remembering and why do we participate in Remembrance Day? I am asked this question by my kids every year as they watch their dad press his dress uniform, shine his boots, and don his beret. I gently remind them that Dad and I have personal connections to some of those faces on the Remembrance Day tribute video. We remind them that every person in those videos was someone’s friend, parent, spouse/partner, child, brother or sister in arms, grandparent, or ancestor.

The act of remembrance means we are slowing down and taking the time to honour those who were lost. Remembrance Day was first observed to commemorate the armistice agreement that ended the First World War on Monday, November 11, 1918. We remember the more than 230,000 Canadians who have served and the more than 118,000 who made the ultimate sacrifice. Remembrance Day is honoured around the world from some of the commonwealth states such as the United Kingdom and Australia and other countries including France, Belgium, and Poland. In Canada the red poppy is the symbol of Remembrance Day and is supported by the Royal Canadian Legion to aid veterans.

It is our first year in Edmonton and, while my family has had the privilege of honouring Remembrance Day across Canada, we don’t know what this year will look like. Wherever we go, I look forward to sharing a moment of silence and the sound of the bugle playing The Last Post.

Stasia – KARA Staff Member